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Dacia car sales in Europe up by almost 24pc in September

Dacia sales in Europe have grown by 23.8% in Europe (EU plus EFTA countries), and the carmaker’s market share rose from 2.3% to 2.4%, the European Automobiles Manufacturers Association (ACEA) informs on Tuesday.

Dacia car registrations in Europe last month reached 35,648 units, up from September 2016 (33,824 vehicles). The EFTA (European Free Trade Association) is currently composed of four states: Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.

France’s Renault and PSA Peugeot Citroen reported sales growth of 0.4% and 70.1% respectively. German groups Volkswagen and Daimler recorded a 1.1% and 1.2% decline in sales last month, while Ford sales fell by 13%.

In March, PSA Peugeot Citroen acquired Opel and its British Vauxhall brand, and as of August 1, 2017, Opel and Vauxhall are included in the PSA Group statistics.

In the first nine months of this year, Dacia car supplies grew by 29.5% in Europe, and the carmaker’s market share rose from 2.8% to 3%. Dacia car registrations in Europe amounted to 256,697 units, up against the same period in 2016 (322,937 vehicles).

In September 2017, passenger car registrations across the European Union fell by 2.0%, totalling 1,427,105 units. However, it must be noted that September 2016 figures (the highest total on record to date) constituted a high basis of comparison. Momentum in some of the EU’s five key markets is starting to slow, especially in the United Kingdom (‐9.3%) and Germany (‐3.3%). However, these declines were partially offset by the solid performance of the Italian and Spanish markets (up 8.1% and 4.6% respectively), the ACEA release further informs.

Over the first nine months of 2017, demand for passenger cars remained positive in the EU, with almost 11.7 million new vehicles registered – an increase of 3.7% compared to the same period last year. Italy (+9.0%), Spain (+6.7%), France (+3.9%) and Germany (+2.2%) performed well so far in 2017, although UK car demand fell by 3.9%. Noteworthy is the strong performance of the new EU member states, where registrations went up by 13.8% during the period.

About Valeriu Lazar