Pelisor Castle closed for cleanup in October, Peles Castle in November

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Pelisor Castle in Sinaia mountain resort will be closed by the end of October to undergo some precautionary conservation works. His older brother, Peles Castle will be closed for the same end in November.

According to the representatives of Peles National Museum, Pelisor will close gates to visitors this month for cleaning and conservation works, while the pieces going on display within the permanent exhibition will be checked up and those who need restoration will be selected.

Peles larger castle will undergo similar checks in November, the administrators claiming they chose this month to close the palace, as the number of visitors is lower this time of the year.

Peles Castle is now opened to visitors every Wednesday, 11:00-16.15 and from Thursday to Sunday, 9:15-16:15. It is closed on Monday and Tuesday.

Visiting ground floor of the castle will cost you RON 20, with discounts for pensioners (RON 10) and for pupils and students (RON 5). The cost for the ground and first floor tour is RON 50 for adults, RON 25 for pensioners and RON 12.5 for pupils and students.

Pelisor Castle was built in 1899–1902 by order of King Carol I as the residence for his nephew and heir, the future King Ferdinand (son of Carol’s brother Leopold von Hohenzollern) and Ferdinand’s consort, Queen Marie of Romania.

Marie’s favorite hideaway, Pelisor was also the location where she died. The silver box holding her heart will be transferred from the National History Museum of Romania to Pelisor Castle on November 3.

Pelisor was designed by the Czech architect Karel Liman in the Art Nouveau style; the furniture and the interior decorations were designed mostly by the Viennese Bernhard Ludwig. There are several chambers, working cabinets, a chapel, and “the golden room”. Queen Marie herself made many of the artistic decisions about the design of the palace, and participated in its decoration, including as a painter. Queen Marie considered Art Nouveau a weapon against sterile historicism, creating a personal style combining Art-Nouveau elements with Byzantine and Celtic elements.

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